Develop Your Mental Game

17
Aug

Develop Your Mental Game

Via Mentalitywod.com
#MotivationalMonday

“Throughout the past five weeks, you were faced with thousands of decisions to make. Each of these decisions, whether in the moment or planned, determined your performance. So how do you make better decisions to improve your performance?

Experience. The more the better.

But while you are gaining experience, you can start working on a few things. First, figure out what type of CrossFit athlete you are. Are you here to improve your training and health? Are you using CrossFit as a recreational sport, going to local competitions to compete? Or are you looking at CrossFit as a high-level sport and dreaming of one day being at the CrossFit Games with the big name athletes.

Once you know what type of CrossFit athlete you are, you can determine what motivates you. Are you a “competitor vs. competitor” type? Do you find out how others did on a workout and try to beat them? Do you always check the white board to compare or beat someone else’s score? Or are you a “you vs. yourself” type? Always looking to improve on your own score from yesterday and using this to gauge your progress.

Learning the perfect balance between the two types is what makes you successful. In local competitions, turn on the “competitor vs. competitor” mode. This is the time to allow yourself to compete against your peers as an individual or team. But in daily training, look for personal progress.

“Competitor vs. competitor” mode is a hard way to live 24/7/365. It will burn you out because you never truly see your own progress. We see it often in our newer athletes. You see how much someone else is lifting, or how fast someone else is doing kipping pull-ups and start to compare yourself, giving yourself a hard time if you aren’t “keeping up.” As coaches, we have to constantly remind people that it is a journey. Yes, those skills are appealing; however, it is never worth skipping the process – what ultimately makes you stronger – to try to get ahead. Remember, not everything is a race.” Continued…